Community engagement to strengthen social cohesion and child protection in Chad and Burundi – “Bottom Up” participatory monitoring, planning and action

Published: July 2016
Author: International Institute for Child Rights and Development (IICRD), Dr. Philip Cook, Michele Cook, Natasha Blanchet Cohen, Armel Oguniyi & Jean Sewanou

The final report on” Community engagement to strengthen social cohesion and child protection in Chad and Burundi: “Bottom Up” participatory monitoring, planning and action. July 20th 2016.

Compiled by:
International Institute for Child Rights and Development (IICRD), Dr. Philip Cook, Michele Cook, Natasha Blanchet Cohen, Armel Oguniyi & Jean Sewanou

Funded by:
UNICEF’s Peacebuilding, Education and Advocacy Programme (PBEA), Learning for Peace

Request for Consultancy Applications

Published: 22 September 2016
Author: Interagency Learning Initiative on Community Based Child Protection Mechanisms and Child Protection Systems

Building the evidence base on effective models of community-led child protection and bottom-up child protection systems strengthening – developing case studies of effective practice in Uganda and Tanzania

Date of issue: 21 September 2016
Submission deadline 14 October 2016
Duration of assignment: 6 months on a part-time basis (estimated 53 consultancy
days)
Expected start date: 1 January 2017

Presentation by Patrick Onyango – Kampala workshop, 17-18 August, 2016

Published: August 2016
Author: Patrick Onyango

Girl mothers in armed forces and groups and their children in Northern Uganda, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Participatory Action Research to assess and improve their situations.

PAR UNICEF PP presentation Girl Mothers Findings May 2010

Presentation by Eddy Walakira – Kampala workshop, 17-18 August, 2016

Published: August 2016
Author: Eddy Walakira

This presentation looks at the results of a War Child Holland initiative in Northern Uganda around prevention of violence against children in a post war setting.

Study on the issues and risks for child protection in the Segou region in Mali

Published: 2014
Author: Frédérique Boursin-Balkouma - Sociologue - Spécialiste en protection de l’enfant, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Nouhoun Sidibé - Enseignant – Chercheur - Spécialiste en Education, ISFRA, Bamako, Mali

Through a participative diagnostic, a study sponsored by the Terre des hommes NGO in the health districts of Markala and Macina aimed at identifying the most common risks for child protection as well as existing endogenous protection practices.

By endogenous protection practices, we mean collective or individual practices that members of the community (families, children, leaders, groups, etc.) develop on their own initiative in order to prevent or reduce the risks for children facing potential dangers.

The study, carried out in the 10 towns in the health regions of Macina and Markala, allowed us to identify the main risks and issues in child protection, and in particular to understand the abilities and the resources in these communities for dealing with them.

In spite of the restricted scale of the study, the results contribute to our understanding of the rural communities and their perceptions concerning child protection. The study was carried out relatively soon after the food and security crisis in Mali. Because of this it provides information about how the specific context affected children’s rights in the two districts.

Etude sur les problématiques et les risques de protection de l’enfance – Etude de cas dans la région de Segou, Mali

Published: 2014
Author: Frédérique Boursin-Balkouma - Sociologue - Spécialiste en protection de l’enfant, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Nouhoun Sidibé - Enseignant – Chercheur - Spécialiste en Education, ISFRA, Bamako, Mali

A travers un diagnostic participatif, l’étude commanditée par l’ONG Terre des hommes dans les districts sanitaires de Markala et Macina avait pour objectif d’identifier les problématiques et les risques de protection de l’enfance les plus répandus ; ainsi que de découvrir les pratiques endogènes de protection (PEP) existantes.

Par pratiques endogènes de protection, on entend les pratiques, collectives ou individuelles, que les acteurs au niveau communautaire (familles, enfants, leaders, groupes, etc.) développent de leur propre initiative afin de prévenir ou de réduire les risques pour les enfants face aux dangers potentiels.

L’étude menée à l’échelle des dix localités des aires de santé de Macina et de Markala a permis d’identifier les principaux risques et problématiques de protection pour les enfants, mais surtout d’appréhender la connaissance, les capacités et les ressources des communautés pour les prendre en charge.

Malgré l’échelle restreinte de l’étude, les résultats de l’étude contribuent à la compréhension des communautés rurales et à leurs perceptions en matière de protection de l’enfance. L’étude a été menée relativement vite après la crise alimentaire et sécuritaire au Mali. Ainsi, elle fournit également des informations sur la manière dont ce contexte spécifique a pu affecter les droits de l’enfant dans les deux districts.

National Child Protection Systems in the east Asia and Pacific region – a review and analysis of mappings and assessments

Published: 2014
Author: ECPAT International, Plan International, Save the Children, UNICEF and World Vision - ECPAT International, Bangkok

A review of mappings and assessments of the child protection system in 14 countries was commissioned by the Inter-Agency Steering Committee (IASC), a subcommittee of the East Asia and Pacific Child Protection Working Group.

This report presents the findings of that review. The countries consist of Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Vietnam. There are a variety of ways that these can be interpreted and applied.

There appears to be growing awareness of and demand for a child protection system that works in harmony with the cultural and social contexts in which they operate. Increasingly, there is an understanding of the role that culture has in determining how and why a system functions as it does and ultimately the effect it has on the protection outcomes for children.

In many countries with few resources, it is imperative to draw upon positive cultural assets, including protective family and community practices, such as kinship care and traditional mediation processes.

An Overview of the Community Driven Intervention To Reduce Teenage Pregnancy in Sierra Leone

Published: 2014
Author: Mike Wessells, David Lamin, & Marie Manyeh

The Interagency Learning Initiative has cultivated a process of community-driven action that addresses needs of vulnerable children in Bombali and Moyamba Districts of Sierra Leone through linkages and partnership between rural communities and the formal health and child protection systems.

The initial stage was ethnographic research that enabled learning about local views of childhood, harms to children, what happens when the harms occur, and linkages with the formal system. The research took place in a cluster of three villages from a single Chiefdom in each of the two districts.

The ethnographic findings were shared back with each cluster of communities, who validated the findings and reflected on their own on what they should do to address the problems. In important respects, these reflections set the stage for the next phase – the action research phase.

Research Brief: An Ethnographic Study of Community-Based Child Protection Mechanisms and their Linkages with the National Child Protection System of Sierra Leone

Published: April 2012
Author: Inter-Agency Learning Initiative on Community-Based Child Protection Mechanisms and Child Protection Systems

This document serves as a seven-page summary of the longer report included among these research documents, “An Ethnographic Study of Community-Based Child Protection Mechanisms and their Linkages with the National Child Protection System of Sierra Leone.”

Kwa Wazee’s Impact assessment of Self Defense – the views of the participants

Published: 2011
Author: Kwa Wazee

A 2011 evaluation of the Kwa Wazee girl’s self-defence training initiative in Nshamba, Tanzania.

Strengthening National Child Protection Systems in Emergencies through Community-Based Mechanisms: A Discussion Paper

Published: 2010
Author: Alyson Eynon and Sarah Lilley for Save the Children UK on behalf of the Child Protection Working Group of the UN Protection Cluster

This discussion paper uses three case studies – Myanmar, the occupied Palestinian territories, and Timor Leste – to examine the state of evidence about strengthening national child protection systems through community-based mechanisms during emergencies.

Executive Summary: What are we learning about protecting children in the community?

Published: 2009
Author: Mike Wessells, lead consultant, on behalf of an Inter-Agency Working Group

This 20-page executive summary presents an overview of the key findings from a 2009 inter-agency review of the evidence on community-based child protection mechanisms. The full report is also available in this research section.

Advocacy through community engagement

Published: 2009
Author: Child Hope UK

The Child Advocacy Project is a collaborative approach to advocacy addressing access to children’s rights. Working in partnership, four partner organisations have developed strategies for improving access to health, housing and welfare rights of children and families affected by HIV and AIDS and other vulnerable children in South Africa.

This booklet is part of a series on Collaborative Approaches to Advocacy in partnership with CINDI. It inspires community-based advocacy initiatives through community engagement strategies. Presenting a range of different community engagement methods, the booklet reflects on the strengths, weakness and key learnings of each approach to provide recommendations for others working in this sector.

The booklet is intended for use by other organisations and government departments working to promote vulnerable children’s access to their basic rights. It is our hope that it encourages further community engagement and advocacy to empower communities to improve the lives of children and families affected by HIV and AIDS.

A Common Responsibility: The role of community-based groups in protection children from sexual abuse and exploitation – a discussion paper

Published: 2008
Author: Sarah Lilley for Save the Children UK

This 2008 discussion paper shares Save the Children’s experience in working with community-based groups; the paper is an effort to stimulate dialogue by highlighting the successes and challenges of such work.

Community Action and the Test of Time: Learning From Community Experiences And Perceptions

Published: 2006
Author: Jill Donahue and Louis Mwewa

This 2006 publication, supported by a number of organizations working in consortium and produced for review by the United States Agency for International Development’s Displaced Children and Orphans Fund, uses case studies of mobilization and capacity building to for community groups working with vulnerable children in Malawi and Zambia.

Its key findings focus on building community ownership of child protection and welfare issues, sustainability issues, and considerations for reaching the most vulnerable children.